'Two Cents' Worth'

‘Two Cents Worth’ Meaning

According to Dictionary.com: ‘Two cents’ worth ’ means for nothing, for a petty sum. ‘Two cents’ worth’ also means that “of little or no value or importance or worthlessness”. ‘Two cents’ worth means “ to express one’s unsolicited opinion to whatever is worth”. 

Example: Sara made me feel like 2 cents. 

‘Two cents’ worth origin

According to Quora, answered by Daniel Grady: There is hard evidence that the US-variant phrase in print, is from the Olean Evening Times, March 1926. This includes an item by Allene Sumner, headed My “Two cents’ worth” 

Secondly, as per Wikipedia sources: the origin of ‘Two cents’ worth’ is derived from the 16th century English expression “a penny of your thoughts”. 

‘Two cents’ worth Synonyms

  • Opinion
  • Input
  • Perspective
  • Viewpoint
  • Insight
  • Feedback
  • Contribution
  • Thoughts
  • Point of view
  • Observations
  • Considerations
  • Reflection
  • Judgment
  • Commentary
  • Reaction
  • Remarks
  • Evaluation
  • Critique
  • Interpretation
  • Say

‘Two cents’ worth in a sentence

  • Despite being a newcomer to the team, Sarah offered her two cents’ worth during the brainstorming session, contributing valuable ideas.
  • When discussing the budget proposal, the experienced accountant provided his two cents’ worth, highlighting potential cost-saving measures.
  • During the heated debate, everyone wanted to offer their two cents’ worth on the controversial topic, leading to a lively discussion.
  • In the family meeting, each member had the opportunity to share their two cents’ worth on the upcoming vacation destination.
  • As a seasoned journalist, Alex was known for providing his two cents’ worth in newspaper columns, offering insightful commentary on current events.

‘Two cents’ worth Crossword

If you love to solve crosswords for a clue or answer for a crossword puzzle related to “two cents’ worth,” here are a few possibilities: Hope you will enjoy it. 

  • Clue: Expression of one’s opinion
  • Answer: INPUT
  • Clue: A small contribution to a discussion
  • Answer: TWOCENTS
  • Clue: Personal perspective
  • Answer: POINTOFVIEW
  • Clue: Valuable opinion
  • Answer: WISESAYING
  • Clue: Contribution to a conversation
  • Answer: REMARK

‘Two cents’ worth’ Opinion

The expression “two cents’ worth” is frequently employed in casual speech to convey one’s viewpoint on an issue. When someone says they are contributing their “two cents’ worth,” they are expressing their opinion, perspective, or input regarding a specific subject. 

FAQs

1. What does my two cents worth mean?

“Two cents worth” refers to sharing one’s thoughts or opinions, usually on a subject and frequently conveying a humble or personal perspective.

2. How do you use two cents in a sentence?

You can use it like this: I think we should choose the blue color for the logo. However, it’s just my two cents, feel free to decide.

3. What does my cents worth mean?

A variation on “my two cents’ worth,” “my cents’ worth” expresses one’s opinion or contribution to a discussion or decision and is frequently used to convey a personal opinion or recommendation.

4. Is 0.02 the same as 2 cents?

Yes, 0.02 is equivalent to 2 cents. Both represent the same monetary value, with 0.02 being the numerical expression in decimal form.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the idiom “two cents’ worth” originated in English in the 16th century and became well-known in the United States in the early 20th century. It denotes the exchange of individual viewpoints or thoughts on a subject. 

Therefore, keep in mind that even seemingly insignificant contributions can have a big impact on the exchange of ideas the next time you offer your two cents.

About Author

Discover thought-provoking insights from Haji Khan on Optimumchoicehub, your source for top-tier solutions. As a skilled and experienced writer he craft captivating stories that invite you to engage, learn, and see the world anew.

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